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Date:         Fri, 12 Oct 2007 17:04:19 -0700
Reply-To:     Tracey <traceson@YAHOO.COM>
Sender:       Georgia Birders Online <GABO-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
From:         Tracey <traceson@YAHOO.COM>
Subject:      Re: Hemlocks and Birds
In-Reply-To:  <Pine.GSO.4.58.0710120949520.29649@leukothea>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

There is also a significant cost involved.

Tracey Muise

--- Eran Tomer <etomer@EMORY.EDU> wrote:

> Vicky, > > Please see answers in-line. I will refrain from > posting more on this topic > on GABO, though, since it is moving out of scope. > > > If the beetles are "quite effective" against the > woolly adelgid as stated in > > the earlier post, then why are the Hemlock forests > at such risk as we keep > > hearing? > > Because the effective solution is slow to implement > at the needed scale. > The adelgid affects a vast area in the East, > including places that are > very difficult to reach, and spreads rapidly. > Predator beetles are not > (yet) raised on a massive scale for various reasons, > including a need for > specialized facilities and a shortage of funds. The > goal is to create > self-sustaining beetle populations in the wild, as > in the adelgid's > natural range (Asia), that will spread and keep > controlling the pest > long-term throughout the region. This is not simple > to achieve and takes > time, and in the meantime the adelgid keeps wreaking > havoc. We know > hemlock losses will be heavy but, with the beetle's > help, the war should > be won. > > > There's no mention of the actual use of the > beetles in Georgia, just the > > potential use. Have they been used here? If so, > have they been "quite > > effective"? > > Predator beetles have been released in Georgia too > but I don't know the > particulars. DNR folks will probably know more. > > > Why hasn't every at-risk acre been long-since > treated with beetles? > > The beetles selected for propagation feed almost > exclusively on the > adelgid - a fundamental consideration when > introducing an exotic predator > to control an exotic pest. Hence, the beetles will > only become established > in areas already infested with the adelgid. The > beasts usually takes 2-4 > years to kill a tree so beetles have time to move in > and destroy them. > > Also, there are millions of at-risk acres and many > are inaccessible or on > private land. > > Best regards, > > - Eran Tomer > Atlanta, GA > > ********** > To search GABO-L archives or manage your > subscription, go to > http://www.listserv.uga.edu/archives/gabo-l.html > > To contact a listowner, send message to > GABO-L-request@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU > > To view GABO-L information/guidelines, go to > http://www.gos.org/gabo.html > >

Tracey Muise

"If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate." - Henry J. Tillman

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