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Date:         Tue, 11 Aug 2009 12:48:40 -0400
Reply-To:     Daniel Robertson <djr47@cornell.edu>
Sender:       "SPSSX(r) Discussion" <SPSSX-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
From:         Daniel Robertson <djr47@cornell.edu>
Subject:      Re: Dynamic date writing
In-Reply-To:  <6CD9B6A6B6CCBA4FA497F07182F4EE8302D27FA0@MIAEMAILEVS1.spss.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Well, leave it to me to come up with a complicated solution when a simple one will do! djr

Oliver, Richard wrote: > compute datevar=$date11. > > will return the current date in the form dd-mmm-yyyy. > > If you don't like the dashes, add: > > datevar=replace(datevar, "-", ""). > > -----Original Message----- > From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:SPSSX-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Robertson > Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2009 11:13 AM > To: SPSSX-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU > Subject: Re: Dynamic date writing > > There are probably clever non-Python ways to do this, but if you're > using Python, getting the current local date is pretty easy using the > datetime library: > > import datetime > mydate = str(datetime.date.today()) > > which returns '2009-08-11' as a string. If you want the date to be > formatted differently, as in your example, you can extract and rearrange > the date components, e.g., something like... > > myyear = str(datetime.date.today().year) # extract the year from the > date object, as a string > mymonth = str(datetime.date.today().month) # extract the month from > the date object, as a string > myday = str(datetime.date.today().day) # extract the day from the date > object, as a string > datestring = myyear[2:4] + mymonth.zfill(2) + myday # retain just the > last two digits of the year, and if the month is a single digit, left > pad it with a '0' > > ...which gives datestring a value of '090811'. I'm sure there are more > elegant ways to do this in Python, but you get the idea. > > > Mario Giesel wrote: > >> Hello, SPSS users, I've got a question on dynamic date writing: >> >> I have daily exports of an increasing spss data file. >> File names differ in the date they were written, e.g. >> C:\data\090810_export.sav >> C:\data\090811_export.sav >> ... >> >> I want to insert the date part of the file name automatically, >> i.e. the actual date is to be detected by the system and inserted into >> the concatenated path. So far I use this solution: >> >> =============================================== >> DEFINE !path () >> "C:\data\" >> !ENDDEFINE. >> DEFINE !date () >> "090811" >> !ENDDEFINE. >> SAVE OUTFILE = !path + !date + "_export.sav". >> =============================================== >> >> Here I have to change the date part manually, however. >> Any suggestions are really welcome. >> >> Good luck, >> Mario >> >> >> > > >

-- Daniel Robertson Senior Research and Planning Associate Institutional Research and Planning Cornell University / irp.cornell.edu

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