LISTSERV 16.0

Help for SHOREBIRDS Archives

UGA Help Desk

Request a List


SHOREBIRDS Archives

SHOREBIRDS Archives


SHOREBIRDS@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SHOREBIRDS Home

SHOREBIRDS Home

SHOREBIRDS  November 2005

SHOREBIRDS November 2005

Subject:

Temmicks Stint, Bar wit in WA

From:

Robert Wallace <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Robert Wallace <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 20 Nov 2005 16:33:46 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (45 lines)

A TEMMINCK'S STINT, was observed at the sewage treatment plant south
pond,
in Ocean Shores, WA--by Patrick and Ruth Sullivan, expert birders from
the
Tacoma area. Patrick realized it was a stint, and using Dennis
Paulson's
Book,Shorebirds of N.America--along with hearing the very
characteristic
call, was able to ID the juvenile TEMMINCK'S STINT, which has a plain,
medium brown back, but with a dark, brown "V" of scapular markings.
The
bill is dark; legs are yellow; underside is white. White, spectacle
like
markings go from the eyes, to the base of the bill.  When close to the
bird,
a thin eye line was observable.

The broad, lateral tail markings--with the dark center of tail, is
distinctive; I only saw this on one occasion.

Also present at the same location, both Nov. 13 & 14, was a juvenile
RUFF,
who slept with the LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS, at the edge of the pond.

At the rock jetty, less than a mile west of the STP, a flock of BLACK
TURNSTONES; SURFBIRDS; and ROCK SANDPIPERS were seen both days.

Upon the advice of the Sullivans, I went to Tokeland, WA--where the
largest
flock of wintering MARBLED GODWITS are usually found on the beach, by
the
marina--at the end of the road on this peninsula; I was unable to pick
out a
BAR-TAILED GODWIT, from the ~1000 MARBLED GODWITS; but upon my return,
Mike
Miller, a birder from the San Francisco Bay area, had found one; it is
shorter, and is not readily seen when in the crowd; fortunately, it did
come
to the waters edge, and I was able to get some photos.

Anyone wanting more details, contact me directly.

Happy Birding,  and Happy Thanksgiving.

Jim Swarr,   St. Petersburg,   FL

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
January 2019
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
April 2016
March 2016
December 2015
August 2015
April 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
September 2014
August 2014
March 2014
February 2014
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
March 2013
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
November 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
December 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
March 2010
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
November 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
February 2008
January 2008
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.UGA.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager