Print

Print


A TEMMINCK'S STINT, was observed at the sewage treatment plant south
pond,
in Ocean Shores, WA--by Patrick and Ruth Sullivan, expert birders from
the
Tacoma area. Patrick realized it was a stint, and using Dennis
Paulson's
Book,Shorebirds of N.America--along with hearing the very
characteristic
call, was able to ID the juvenile TEMMINCK'S STINT, which has a plain,
medium brown back, but with a dark, brown "V" of scapular markings.
The
bill is dark; legs are yellow; underside is white. White, spectacle
like
markings go from the eyes, to the base of the bill.  When close to the
bird,
a thin eye line was observable.

The broad, lateral tail markings--with the dark center of tail, is
distinctive; I only saw this on one occasion.

Also present at the same location, both Nov. 13 & 14, was a juvenile
RUFF,
who slept with the LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS, at the edge of the pond.

At the rock jetty, less than a mile west of the STP, a flock of BLACK
TURNSTONES; SURFBIRDS; and ROCK SANDPIPERS were seen both days.

Upon the advice of the Sullivans, I went to Tokeland, WA--where the
largest
flock of wintering MARBLED GODWITS are usually found on the beach, by
the
marina--at the end of the road on this peninsula; I was unable to pick
out a
BAR-TAILED GODWIT, from the ~1000 MARBLED GODWITS; but upon my return,
Mike
Miller, a birder from the San Francisco Bay area, had found one; it is
shorter, and is not readily seen when in the crowd; fortunately, it did
come
to the waters edge, and I was able to get some photos.

Anyone wanting more details, contact me directly.

Happy Birding,  and Happy Thanksgiving.

Jim Swarr,   St. Petersburg,   FL