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From: "C. Robert Dove" <[log in to unmask]>
Date: May 9, 2014 at 10:05:43 AM EDT
To: "Tommy Waldrop ([log in to unmask])" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: FW: SWINE PEDv and SHOW PIGS  -- PLEASE MAKE SURE ANYONE DEALING WITH THE SWINE PROJECT GETS THIS!!!

Tommy,

 

Can you send this out to all of your teachers please.

 

Thanks,

 

Robert

 

 

C. Robert Dove

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Coordinator and Swine Extension Specialist

Department of Animal and Dairy Science

248 Rhodes Center for Animal and Dairy Science

University of Georgia

425 River Road

Athens, GA 30602

 

[log in to unmask]

706-583-0796

 

From: C. Robert Dove
Sent: Friday, May 09, 2014 10:04 AM
To: All County/District/State ANR Faculty/Staff & Co. UGE Addresses <[log in to unmask]> ([log in to unmask]); [log in to unmask]
Subject: SWINE PEDv and SHOW PIGS -- PLEASE MAKE SURE ANYONE DEALING WITH THE SWINE PROJECT GETS THIS!!!

 

Good Morning,

 

As most of you are aware PEDv (Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus) has been sweeping across the nation.  This is very serious virus that has the potential to be 100% fatal in all pigs under 3 weeks of age and will cause production losses during all phases of production.  Currently there are over 5500 swine farms across the U.S. reported to have the disease and estimates are that production will be decreased 7-9% this year because of this disease.  At this time there are no reports of swine herds in Georgia having this disease, although the virus has been isolated at a congregation point within the state. Please remember this disease will become a USDA reportable disease in May. At that time producers and Veterinarians will be required by law to report the disease if it is found in their production facilities. This disease is not zoonotic and effects only swine.  It has no effect on meat quality and meat from infected pigs is safe for consumption.  I have attached a fact sheet from Dr. Cobb’s office concerning this disease and the biosecurity precautions that need to be taken to avoid contracting the disease.

 

As your exhibitors start to travel to other states to select show pigs it is critical that they follow strict biosecurity protocols.  Prior to entering any swine unit, they should be asking the owners if the farm is positive for PED and if it is, they should not enter it.  This virus can survive on cloths, tires, trailers, boots, etc. for  7 days or longer.  When they visit a farm they should wear disposable plastic boots and be very careful not to track any manure or other bodily fluids into their vehicle or trailer.  Your exhibitors should also be aware that many of the farms they will want to visit will have increased biosecurity procedures in place and they need to contact the farms prior to arrival to verify what biosecurity is in place.  Visiting multiple farms in a day should be discouraged and in many cases will not be possible.  I have attached 2 fact sheets from National Pork Board concerning proper biosecurity when visiting farms or sales looking for show pigs.  As the price of pork has increased significantly because of this virus, your exhibitors probably should expect to pay more for show pigs this summer as well.

 

Please be aware that it is critical that your exhibitors purchase pigs only from farms that are PEDv negative.  It is very possible that they will have to certify that the pigs came from a PEDv negative herd before they will be able to get health papers on their pigs.  If you co-mingle pigs in a common location prior to the show, it is likely that all pigs at that location will have to be certified as coming from a PEDv negative herd and your Veterinarian will have to certify they are all PEDv negative before they can receive health papers and be eligible to show.  These new regulations are currently being discussed and I will keep you informed as I learn more.

 

PEDv is a very serious issue to the U.S. Swine Industry and could be devastating to the Georgia Swine Industry.  Not only would commercial production be effected, but the show pig industry will be as well.  It is critical that we do everything possible to keep this disease out of Georgia swine herds. This requires that everyone follow strict biosecurity procedures especially when traveling out of state to purchase pigs.  Please make sure that one of your exhibitors is not “THE ONE” who brings this disease to Georgia herds.

 

If you have any questions or if I can be of further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me.

 

Robert

 

C. Robert Dove

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Coordinator and Swine Extension Specialist

Department of Animal and Dairy Science

248 Rhodes Center for Animal and Dairy Science

University of Georgia

425 River Road

Athens, GA 30602

 

[log in to unmask]

706-583-0796