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Dear Ed,

Dave was indeed a special person. I think he was the first member of the ciliate community that I ever talked to when my (late) mentor, Hewson Swift recommended I call him for advice as I was just starting to work on Tet. He advised a know-nothing cell biologist carefully and without hesitation and I quickly found out what a wonderful teacher he was. He never failed continue to “mentor” me at Ciliate meetings. Thankfully, he also passed down his knowledge and teaching skills to you and to Peter, who were brought Tet genetics to a state of sophistication and elegance that could be understood by anyone was willing to spend a little time to learn it and was smart enough to pick your brains when they were not. He was brilliant, kind generous and self-effacing and he will be missed.


Marty


On Jun 4, 2016, at 11:23 AM, Ed Orias <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:



Dear members of the ciliate research community,

Today I was deeply saddened to receive a phone call from Jean Nanney informing me of the passing away of David L. Nanney, my PhD mentor and almost a second parent to me. For newcomers to our field, David established the field of Tetrahymena genetics, and made seminal contributions to Tetrahymena biology. As a PhD student of Tracy M. Sonneborn -- the initiator of the microbial genetics field -- David contributed to the early understanding of epigenetics in Paramecium. His legacy remains a foundation for much of the exciting on-going scientific work in our field.

Sadly yours,

Eduardo Orias
Research Professor,
Dept. of MCD Biology,
University of California Santa Barbara