Dear Ciliate Community Members,

 

I have written some of you some select emails as to my thought about Marty...this includes Joyce and his family, Jody, Jeff Hayes (who informed me of Marty's passing), Sean Taverna and a few other.  Of course, I too echo all of what has been said about Marty, the scientist and Marty, the man.  Both were off-scale.

 

There is little that I can add except in my time in Marty's lab, I grew immensely under Marty's wisdom and passion for all things Tetrahymena.  We published many papers together when I was a postdoc with him, and while I was the "doer" of the actual experiments and benchwork, Marty was often the "brains" behind the work.  I would write paper drafts up to give to Marty, but when he had been through the paper, it was always transformed into a much better pieces.  I often told Marty that he and I should strike a deal - I would do all of the experiments and he would write all of the papers that came from my work.  For me, Marty could write like no other, but I learned from him how to do and write science.

 

My postdoc with Marty transformed in a true friendship that lasted the rest of his life.  We attended many chromatin meetings together, shared a room, drove to the meeting together often stopping for a terrific lunch meal that Marty and Joyce had prepared for us.  He was as close to being a "father" to me as my own, and he often shared gems of wisdom with respect to what really mattered in life.  My all-time favorite conversation can one evening from our bedroom in Tilton, NH where he said: "Life is pretty simple -- find something that you like to do, and find someone who up like to share it with.  That is it!" --  I repeated this nugget of Marty's wisdom to all three of my grownup kids, and remind myself often how lucky I am to have found both of those things in my life.

 

He was a very special leader of our fields.  I miss him, but have enjoyed hearing from so many of you.

 

Have a good fall and upcoming  holiday season remembering and celebrating this special man.

 

Warm regards,

 

David Allis